Insight

White paper

The TFT two step approach to supersession

Supersession is an undefined quasi-legal term used in dilapidations disputes. In broad terms, most understand it to mean that the actions of the landlord might (or might not) affect their ability to claim certain items from their former tenants. For the first time, an approach to supersession has been developed, based on standard principles of contractual damages claims, which suggests what issues are relevant and how to decide whether the landlord’s claim should or should not be ‘superseded’.

The TFT Two Step Approach to Supersession was used as the basis for the first instance of formal RICS guidance on this concept, within the current edition of the RICS Dilapidations Guidance Note (England and Wales), the author of which was TFT’s Jon Rowling.

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White paper

The Role of Property in Delivering Edinburgh’s Economic Potential

‘The role of property in delivering Edinburgh’s economic potential’, the latest research by ThinkBarn commissioned by TFT, makes it clear that the continued economic evolution of Edinburgh depends on the city’s ability to deliver continued improvements in productivity and growth.

Publication

The future of dilapidations? It’s here already.

The recent Dilapidations Forum Conference looked ahead to the dilapidations landscape in 2027. TFT Partner Paul Spaven and Chairman of the RICS Dilapidations Forum Steering Group summarises the issues in the December 2017/January 2018 issue of RICS Building Surveying Journal.

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White paper

Supersession: Mitigation and Causation

Supersession can be a largely undefined dilapidations concept. The two principles of mitigation and causation can be used to define the assessment of damages in dilapidations disputes. Our new White Paper, Supersession: Mitigation and causation, considers these concepts in more details.

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Advice

Dilapidations: Preparation and Negotiation

An e-learning CPD training video providing a background to dilapidations for all RICS surveyors and the M&E community.

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Insight

TFT’s paper on dilapidations ADR identifies the options available in the UK

An article by Jon Rowling, who heads TFT’s dilapidations, service charge and dispute resolutions services, identifies alternative forms of dispute resolution for dilapidations disputes in the United Kingdom. Published in the Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation Volume 6 Number 2, it suggests that the various forms of ADR should always be considered as a preferable approach to litigation.

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White paper

New Cardiff research paper published

Cardiff’s long history as a capital and industrial city has submitted to global economic change in recent years. A period of relatively poor economic performance and business investment has spurred a period of introspection. The emerging vision for the city’s future is ambitious and exciting. TFT’s newly published paper: ‘Cardiff: How property is helping the city rise to a new challenge’ reveals the changing urban fabric, the opportunities and challenges for the city’s property sector and how Cardiff’s growth will place demands on the existing infrastructure.

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Publication

A masterclass in sustainable development

Pinnacle House in south-west London has been sustainably refurbished to a very high standard. In the latest issue of Building Surveying Journal (BSJ), TFT Partner Dan Henn explains how it was done.

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Advice

MEES: A Changing Dilapidations Landscape

The implications for the commercial sector are wide reaching and pose some interesting questions about how landlord and tenant matters should be approached in the lead up to, and after 2018.

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White paper

New research paper charts Edinburgh’s continued economic evolution

TFT’s latest research paper – ‘The role of property in delivering Edinburgh’s economic potential’ – is published today.

In common with cities across the globe, Edinburgh is seeing economic change brought about by the continued evolution in the interrelated areas of technology, corporate structures and working practices. The paper considers how the very particular characteristics of Edinburgh make it well placed to capitalise on these global forces of economic change. It also highlights how success depends on delivering scale and how Edinburgh’s commercial property market must deliver this scale if the city is to keep pace with the pressures of economic success.

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